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Business BS

…and the Survey Says!

Now that I defined the origin of the name of this business model in the previous article, it’s time to put some proof in this pudding.  Every once in awhile I come across surveys listing the Worst Places to Work For.  This is a good starting point because it highlights the activities contributing to this business model as they are more prevalent in these places establishing a baseline of support.  There are plenty of complaint sites out there but the problem with them is that more people go there to complain than praise.  SiteJabber is one of the better ones because some companies do have good ratings.  It is a great place to check out Gig Economy companies like Uber, Lyft, SiteJabber, AirBnB, etc but for this Glassdoor was used because they initially created this survey which was then passed on after just 2 years of publications.

The Worst Companies to Work For and Why (2013-2017)

An article on The Balance describes how the origin of this list started; “Few organizations are brave enough to release “worst” lists.  We can only imagine the backlash that happens when a multi-billion dollar retailing company is identified as the “worst” in any way. However, Glassdoor.com is one organization that dared to compile and make public a “Worst Companies to Work For” list beginning in 2008, based on voluntary employee surveys that evaluate eight workplace factors:

  • Senior Leadership
  • Communication
  • Employee Morale
  • Career Opportunities
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Compensation and Benefits
  • Recognition and Feedback
  • Fairness and Respect

Glassdoor stopped publishing its “worst employers” list after 2009, but using the data available on the Glassdoor website, 24/7 Wall St. has been creating its own Worst Workplaces list since 2012, based on its research and analysis of the ratings, rankings, and comments which are publicly available on Glassdoor.com.”

The majority of the names listed below come from 24/7 Wall St.’s 2013-2017 reports yet I also discovered one 2009 report which would be the second and final one from Glassdoor.  The Balance article goes from 2008 to 2015 but focused solely on retail and all employers is the focus of this Business Model so it’s included in the references for review.  Interestingly, I’ve worked for two of these companies.  One as an employee for over 6 years and the other as a contractor for 6 months until Corporate Budgeting cancelled it without informing my manager.

24/7 Wall St. Worst Places to Work For (2013-2017)

ADT*, AECOM, Alorica, AutoZone, Bank of New York Mellon, Books-A-Million, Brookdale Senior Living*, Broomfield, The Children’s Place*, CompuCom, Computer Services Corp, CVS, Dilliard’s**, DHL, DISH**, Dollar General*, Dominion Enterprises, Express Scripts**, Family Dollar*, Fiserv, Forever 21**, The Fresh Market, Frontier Communications*, Gamestop, Hertz, Genesis Healthcare, Gibson Guitar, Hewlett-Packard, hhgregg, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Jo-Ann Stores, Jos. A. Bank Clothiers, Kmart*, Kraft/Heinz*, L.A. Fitness, NCR, OfficeMax, RadioShack*, Rain Bird, Rent-A-Center, RGIS, Rite Aid, Ross, Robert Half International, Sears**, Spherion, Teleperformance, United Airlines, and Xerox**

*appeared in two of the four years
**appeared in 3 or more years

I went through each company summary of the complaints and aggregated them into a list.  It actually didn’t take that long before they became redundant indicating the same problems are happening regardless of employer type.

  • Layoffs and plant/store closures due to cost cutting measures and/or mergers (eroding or threatening Job Security and morale)
  • Long work days/weeks; No Work-Life Balance with some having to be available 24/7
  • Unrealistic expectations such as sales quotas or performance targets
  • Low or stagnant wages, long hours and out of touch and/or unsympathetic management and/or micromanaged with poor benefits of high deductible and/or high contribution levels.
  • Management Cliques resulting in Favoritism
  • Management Bullying
  • Management out of touch with employees
  • Unacceptable work environment such as too hot or cold with no response to complaints
  • Illegal activities the results of which impact employees in a variety of ways including layoffs, attrition, and pay cuts as the results of fines or other enforced restrictions.

Here are a few highlights of 24/7 Wall St. comments about these reports: Continue reading