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The Gig Economy Preparation Guide

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It is actually somewhat stupefying the wide variety of ways the definitions used to describe the Gig Economy are used.  As I continue to investigate this I keep coming across the same words but not always used in the same way.  There are some basic things that are the same such as being an independent contractor and perhaps a Freelancer yet beyond that it’s almost the author’s personal preferences of how to use them especially the term “gigging”.  Some gigging articles don’t even mention freelancing and only focus on the On Demand app aspect of this.  If you’re like me finding yourself at the short end of a very long stick requiring you to re-invent yourself to some degree, this can be very confusing leaving you to figure it out for yourself even if it means using these terms for your own personal use.  It appears that pre-Uber et al, gigging and freelancing were easily interchangeable especially in consideration of the origins of gigging.  Freelancers would have a continuous flow of work or gigs some of which are one offs while others would be repeat business of some degree.  When Uber et al entered the picture then this concept began to morph into something else which is when “On Demand” entered the Gigging Vernacular differentiating itself primarily via being app based, a “Tap and Go” sort of activity which is not part of freelancing because it is more connections based mostly through Social Media and referrals.

What’s in a name?  Well if used to describe something you do, then your identity is involved such as Continue reading

My research into what this “Gig Economy Thing” is all about continues to uncover more and more interesting aspects that I’m not sure are truly being addressed by any one person or organization resulting in a myriad of opinions some of which appear thought out and others not so much.  Some of this is due to it not just being relatively new but also as a result of these activities, there appears to be a new employment designation arising as a result of these confusions as this continues to iron itself out which I will explore in a future post.  The first question was the most obvious; “What’s the difference between Gigging and Freelancing?”  I discovered that although they are frequently used interchangeably, digging deeper demonstrated that is not the case especially due to the persistent growth of the On Demand App aspect which doesn’t necessarily require a specific skill set whereas Freelancing does.  You can review that here.  The one thing that differentiates a traditional employee from those in the Gig Economy is their tax status of 1099 from which I discovered that this is not a simple tax designation as evidenced by the number of various tax codes.  This then brought up the fact that technically those that are considered “entrepreneurs” are also under the 1099 designation so how does that play into the Gig Economy thus explored?

Interestingly and amusing that poor ol’ Freelancing is stuck in the midst of this contrast again, yet when being compared to entrepreneur there appears to be better definitions which at the onset would make one think that it’s better defined but not so much as it appears that many are stuck on the allure of the word “entrepreneur” with some of them either refusing to accept it or at the least not happy about it.  The illusion comes from the misconception that anyone who is in business for themselves is an entrepreneur and even further compounded by attempting to understand if one is better than the other or that there’s a wide gap between the two or putting the two together as if they were the same thing but never delineating it.  Frustrating when all you want are answers on what they are and how they are different so as to know how it all applies to this Gig Economy.

The dictionary definitions that many articles use further compounds this confusion because although they all have similar initial definitions, it’s when you look at the second definition that it becomes apparent how this definition is being confounded due to “cherry picking” the one you like the best.  I’ll use the version from dictionary.com for my example:

  1. a person who organizes and manages any enterprise, especially a business, usually with considerable initiative and risk.
  2. an employer of productive labor; contractor.

Its origin comes from the French word entrepredre which means to undertake (1875-80; < French: literally, one who undertakes (some task)).  There’s also an indication of its use in connection with theatrical production; 1828, “manager or promoter of a theatrical production,” reborrowing of French entrepreneur “one who undertakes or manages,” agent noun from Old French entreprendre “undertake”. The word first crossed the Channel late 15c. but did not stay. Meaning “business manager” is from 1852”.  In contrast to this is the Oxford online dictionary’s definition; “A person who sets up a business or businesses, taking on financial risks in the hope of profit”.  This definition only references “business” with no reference to enterprise, both mentions risk, yet the latter “hopes” for profit.  Using the French derivative of “one who undertakes or manages” you can understand how some would think that if they are in business for themselves in any capacity they are “undertaking or managing” a business yet its use has continued to expand over time.

That’s enough of these “Blathering Vernaculars of Confusion” as the more you look, the cloudier one’s understanding becomes.  A post on Seth Godin’s SAMBA Blog titled “Freelancers vs Entrepreneurs” Continue reading

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